Hair Creator

3 Healthy Food for your Healthy Hair

Hair Creator Salon

3 Best Food for your Hair

a. Eggs

eggs

Eggs? are rich in biotin, a B vitamin essential for hair growth and overall scalp health. People ask me about biotin for hair health all the time — usually, they’ve heard about it on a shampoo commercial or read a magazine article that recommended biotin supplements. Because our bodies make their own biotin in the intestines, and it is plentiful in many common foods, deficiency is very rare. But in those few cases in which people are very ill and don’t have use of their intestines, biotin deficiency causes hair loss. So yes, biotin is important for hair health, but you don’t need to take supplements. Just eat a balanced diet that includes some high-biotin foods: eggs, peanuts, almonds, wheat bran, salmon, avocados, and low-fat cheese

b. Oysters

The mineral zinc is involved in tissue growth and repair — and that includes hair growth. It also helps keep the oil glands around the hair follicles working properly. Low levels of zinc can cause hair loss, slow growth, and dandruff. But the amount you get from eating foods rich in zinc — such as oysters, crab, clams, liver, lean beef, most nuts and seeds, peanut butter, wheat germ, fat-free yogurt, and cheese — is plenty to keep your tresses gorgeous. Aside from a multivitamin that provides up to 100 percent DV, I don’t recommend taking extra zinc supplements because excess zinc can inhibit the body’s ability to absorb copper, a minor but necessary mineral.

c. Sweet Potatoes

Beta-carotene in foods is converted to vitamin A in the body, and vitamin A is necessary for all cell growth, including hair. A deficiency can lead to dry, dull, lifeless hair and dry skin, which can flake off into dandruff. Be aware that you can have too much of a good thing when it comes to vitamin A: Too much can cause hair loss. My advice is to add more beta-carotene-rich foods like sweet potatoes, carrots, kale, butternut squash, cantaloupe, dark green lettuces, asparagus, and pumpkin to your meals rather than take vitamin A supplements. If you should choose to take a multivitamin, check the label to make sure that your brand supplies no more than 50 percent DV of vitamin A in the form of retinol. Retinol is listed on supplement labels as palmitate or acetate, and should never exceed 2,000 IU. The other 50 percent or more should come in the form of beta-carotene (or carotenoids), which is converted to vitamin A only as we need it.